Lexington School & Center for the Deaf

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History

History

Lexington School and Center for the Deaf is comprised of the Lexington School for the Deaf, the Lexington Hearing and Speech Center, Lexington Vocational Services, and the Lexington Center for Mental Health.  We are here to serve the needs of the deaf and hard-of-hearing community in New York City.

The Lexington School, founded in 1865, is the largest school for deaf students in New York State.  It educates deaf children from ages 0-21.  It is unique among schools for the deaf in its use of an innovative teaching model called "mediated learning experience (MLE).”   MLE stresses the importance of the adult "mediator” in the child’s learning and provides teacher and parent training based on this theoretical framework.  Scores on standardized tests attained by Lexington students attest to the effectiveness of MLE in improving the educational attainment of deaf students.    
 
Lexington students come from all over the five boroughs, and a number of students have other disabilities in addition to deafness, including mobility and mental impairments.  Lexington prepares all students to continue on to college, vocational education, job training, or a placement that will support them to live a responsible, productive life.  
 
In addition to its educational program for deaf children, Lexington offers a comprehensive array of services for deaf and hard-of-hearing people of all ages.  The Lexington School has four affiliated centers:  the Center for Mental Health Services, the Center for Vocational Services, the Hearing and Speech Center, and the Lexington School for the Deaf Foundation.  The Lexington School and Center for the Deaf provides education and services to about 2,500 deaf and hard-of-hearing people annually.